Garth Peacock
It's the start of the wader season

Archive

Wednesday 12th February 2020

Thursday 20th February 2020

Slimbrisge WWT Gloucesterdhire

Wednesday 19th February 2020

To end January 2020...

Thursday 30th January 2020

That's the end of 2019 for me.

Friday 20th December 2019

Disaster strikes

Monday 2nd December 2019

It's still very hard work

Saturday 9th November 2019

A quiet month overall

Saturday 2nd November 2019

Week ending 11th October 2019

Friday 11th October 2019

A quiet week

Friday 4th October 2019

A week of mixed fortunes

Tuesday 1st October 2019

The final catch-up

Tuesday 10th September 2019

Post Romania

Wednesday 4th September 2019

Romania Day 7 - 14th June 2019

Saturday 17th August 2019

Romania Day 6 - 13th June 2019

Friday 16th August 2019

Romania Day 5 - 12th June 2019

Wednesday 24th July 2019

Romania Day 4 - 11th June 2019

Thursday 18th July 2019

Romania Day 3 - 10th June 2019

Tuesday 9th July 2019

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Friday 28th July 2017

Last Monday, I had a call from a friend to see if I would like to go to Frampton Marsh RSPB in Lincolnshire as some migrant waders has arrived, namely Red-necked Phalarope and Pectoral Sandpiper.

About this time of the year, the waders that migrated to the north for breeding are beginning to return on their southerly migration and with the common species, there are often rarities that loose their way and migrate down via Europe rather than the Americas. Pectoral Sandpiper is one american species that is quite regular. Red-necked Phalarope is another rarity but I have hundreds of shots of those taken in Iceland and not yet processed so that was not an attraction for me.

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The Pectoral Sandpiper was of interest but I was more keen on going for another one that was showing rather well at Titchwell on the Norfolk coast so off we went. Weather cloudy and dull.

Arriving we headed into the reserve, looked closely at a small flock of Dunlin but the target bird was not there but after a while, we found it, feeding near the path. This meant taking photos from the raised path so looking down on the bird - not ideal - so care was needed to achieve decent shots.

The bird helped a little by going out into the clear water for a bathe and a preen but it was still dull and cloudy.

After that we went to the beach but found nothing really photographable, returned via Parrinder hide where we found a moulting Curlew Sandpiper, recently arrived.

Another try at the Pectoral Sandpiper on the way back that produced nothing extra of note and that was the end of the days photography.