Garth Peacock
A couple of variable weeks - failures and successes.

Archive

The past ten days.

Thursday 16th November 2017

Birdguides Photo of the Week

Wednesday 8th November 2017

A week in pictures

Friday 3rd November 2017

Nothing exciting

Tuesday 17th October 2017

An update from the last few weeks

Wednesday 4th October 2017

Iceland - Day 8 - Monday 12th June 2017

Thursday 14th September 2017

A quick visit to Norfolk

Saturday 19th August 2017

Back to Norfolk

Friday 14th July 2017

A break from Paperwork

Saturday 8th July 2017

View Blog Archive >>
Thursday 1st December 2016

Last week, on Tuesday 22nd November, I spent a few hours in nearby Bassingbourn. I had been made aware of a Dipper that was roosting on private land and was invited to see it. It came in at dusk and sat singing in a shady overhang about 100 metres away - not a recipe for a decent image.

A Dipper in Cambridgeshire is a county rarity. there is just not the habitat of fast flowing water here but this bird has been resident for a few weeks.

At the time, it was not known where it was feeding but some detective work by Rolex Day-Date replica local birders found it - a place called Wellhead Springs - so that is where I spent my time. Nothing doing - not seen or heard - so I went home in the oncoming gloom defeated.

On Friday, at the suggestion of a friend, we went to Needham Market in Suffolk with the object of photographing another Dipper - a Black-bellied Dipper which is a European race dipper. Surely I could not be one of the few people to dip two Dippers in a week. I am!!!

The only bird of note was a Grey Wagtail that showed up just as we were packing up - ISO 4000.

Not a good week but at least a couple of shots just worth keeping, courtesy of the 5DMK4.

I started off this week at Grafham Water on Monday 28th November. A Great Northern Diver had been showing over the weekend near the dam but as I walked up the dam, a birder was walking back saying he had not seen it. Thankfully, I carried on and the bird appeared in the shady side of the tower and proceeded to dive, but getting further away each time.

Eventually, I was able to get surprisingly close and reeled off a load of images. Here are three examples.

Well pleased, I decamped to the hide off Mander car park, hoping for some more shots of the Bewick's Swans but they had moved into the next creek so I amused myself with a pair of close-in Goldeneye.

The following day, I spent the afternoon at Burwell Fen which was literally crawling with birders/photographers. The Short-eared Owls kept well away until near dusk although I noticed a dust up between a Kestrel and a Shortie - rather distant necessitating a heavy crop.

At dusk, a Roe Deer showed quite close making an unusual image.

and a Short-eared-Owl eventually showed up closer, just as the sun was setting.

More images in the Recent Additions section.